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are no exception. it's left people in this country wondering and worried what will happen next. the fabled scotland yard is reeling after two sudden resignations of its most senior leadership. sir paul stephenson, the police chief, and his deputy, john yates, career policemen who are the latest casualties in the phone hacking scandal. scotland yard is being accused of mishandling the investigation into "news of the world qug, maintaining at times close relationships with the very people they were supposed to be investigating. police officers accepting bribes from reporters has allegedly been commonplace. stephenson and yates deny any wrong doing on their part. >> i have acted with complete integrity and my conscience is clear. >> now the department tasked with counterterrorism and the 2012 olympics must find new leadership. what started as a scandal involving a single newspaper has now grown so large, it is rocking this country's institutions and the murdoch empire. so far, there has been four high profile resignations, ten arrests. most recently, rebecca brooks, one of rupert murdoch's most truste
. tonight, scotland yard's lead investigator says there may be as many as 4,000 victims in the case against rupert murdoch's media empire and among them, former prime minister gordon brown who says his family's privacy was violated by a story that hit very close to home. stephanie gosk has the report from london. >> reporter: the british public wants answers. rupert murdoch and top executive, rebecca brooks have all been asked to testify next week before a parliament committee. the powerful trio have yet to agree but "news international" the subsidiary that ran "the news of the world" is already defending itself against the latest allegations. in an interview on the bbc today, former prime minister, gordon brown, accused "news international" of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find this happened because of the links with criminals. >> reporter: in 2006, a murdoch paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brown's newborn son has cystic fibrosis. now brown questions the methods the paper used to get that information
broadcasting. a scandal that scotland yard now says may have targeted as many as 4,000 people. nbc's stephanie goss is in london for an update on moisture dough dock. >> the british public is looking for answers. the head of newscorp corporation rupert murdock, his son, james, and rebecca brooks have been asked to testify next week in front of a parliament. in an interview on the bbc, former prime minister gordon brown accused news international of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find that this happened. because of the links with criminals. >> in 2006, a murdock paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brown's newborn son had cystic fibrosis. now brown questions the methods the paper used to get that information. but a statement from news indianaer national says the story ran from a member of the public whose family has also experienced cystic fibrosis. also on the defensive, investigators from scotland yard who face accusations that police accepted bribees from reporters. >> an organization of 50,000 people, we ha
about whether a blind eye was turnedat scotland yard -- turned at scotland yard. >> for more on the uproar and the culture surrounding the british tabloids, i am joined by a reporter from london. thank you for joining me. coming from this side of the atlantic, is this a uniquely british phenomenon? >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you will get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best-selling newspaper. if you imagine "the national enquirer" was the best-selling newspaper in america, you would understand the situation here. >> they come up with stories that sailed very close to the legal edge. >> they have a culture that says get results whatever the cost. in a situation where circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers, that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line -- the at the line of journalism, as we have seen with these latest "news of the world" allegations. hacking into the phone of a child murder victim. i do not think many people would be shocked, be
criticism of the police was that either there was some kind of cover-up at scotland yard about these allegations, or that they did not realize the seriousness of them at the time. one of the senior policeman in charge of scotland yard, when these allegations first came to light, is just reminding mp's that at the time they were dealing with massive counterterrorism problems, the attacks on 7/7 on the london transport system. at the time, phone hacking was not the priority, but with hindsight, it is obvious it should have been. >> good to see you. thanks. president karzai's half brother, wally tahlak med ahmad karzai, has been shot dead. with a controversial figure. the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack. a few months ago, he was interviewed. >> it is quite extraordinary. we were in kandahar for a film in april, and i noted how many layers of security, barb wire, barriers, concrete walls that he had around his compaq and -- of around his compound. i told him he must be in the most heavily secured building in kandahar, and he said, "i have been attacked many times.
ugly. (laughter) as of now, london's two top policemen at scotland yard let's call them officer blu rotton has resigned. andrew colton has been arrested and sunday tragically authorities arrested poor mrs. weasley. (laughter) wait, no that's not mrs. weasley. sorry, tragically, authorities arrested the guy from simply red. yeah, that's it. actually, arrested was rebekah brooks, the woman who ran "news of the world" during the worst of-- as the british call them-- the troubles. (laughter) brooks had already resigned her post friday, ostensibly to spend more time with her rabbit hair dresser. laug(laughter) that was a deep cut. i appreciate that that was a deep cut. honestly, it is hard to imagine this story... (laughter). all right. it's hard to imagine this story getting more out of control. >> breaking news. >> on the british hacking scandal, just a short time ago, police say sean hoare-- that's the reporter who first alleged widespread hacking at the now ended news of nation-- he's been found dead in his home. (laughter). >> jon: do you think he died of natural causes or was it mu
" reporters used scotland yard police officials to ping people they were following or were interested in. that means they used actual cell phone towers to locate some of the celebrities or politicians that they wanted to follow. these are incredibly incriminating allegations that just go to show how wide the scope of this is, and how high up it goes within scotland yard and you mentioned today that the scotland yard investigators were in a hearing in parliament today facing tough questions from the members of parliament over their accusations that they turned a blind eye to what "news of the world" was doing and police officers were accepting payments of bits of information and on top of that you have prime minister gordon brown in an emotional interview with the bbc expressing his anger in the tactics of the newspapers owned by rupert murdoch were engaged in criminal activities and hired known criminals to get very personal information from him. >> and also, you have got -- this story is more incredible by the moment, but the former pop star and still is, stephanie, george michael went
in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
question this week from the gps challenge is, what is scotland yard's code name for its investigation into phone hacking by british tabloids? is it a, operation weeting, b, operation tweeting, c operation zoomania, d, operation poxlington. make sure to check out our website, the global public square. you'll find smart interviews, takes from some of our favorite experts including myself. you can follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's book is a terrific read. frederick kampi's "berlin 1961." it reminds us of a time much scarier than the present when people feared an all-out nuclear war. the epicenter was berlin. crew chef called it the most dangerous place on earth. it's a fascinating history of a now forgotten time and place that was a turning point in the cold war. now for the last look, if all the infighting in washington is getting to you and you are thinking of going to distant shores, we found a study to help you decide where to go and not to go, the cost of living survey says the most expensive place of ex-pat prs the state is not london, zurich, tokyo or moscow, it is th
the correct answer to our question was, a, operation weeting. it's the code word for the scotland yards phone hacking. it has a book called fittingly enough, the book. go to our website for more. thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. i will see you next week. >>> during the cnn "newsroom," this sunday, july 17th, out of egypt this hour, con clikting reports that hosni mubarak has collapsed into a coma. let's go to fred in cairo. tell us what you can about mubarak's condition. >> reporter: hi, we're still trying to verify that information here in egypt. but the information that we've gotten is that mubarak's lawyer, the man representing him, said that mubarak fell into a coma at midday egyptian time and the lawyer also saying that mubarak's health deteriorated throughout the day and then he finally fell into a coma. now, conflicting to that, the hospital where mubarak is being treated in the town says he has not fallen into a coma. so there are conflicting reports as to what is going on. some news agency reports are saying that it's not unusual for him to dip
for scotland yard. >> the murdochs are on the back foot. this is in the parlaiment and the power of the media. >> that is the latest from britain, where the pressure is mounting. the f.b.i. is probing allegations that newscorp tried to hack the phone records of victims of 9/11. concerns were raised by peter king, and joining him was democrat bruce brailey, who asked the house oversight committee to act. thank you for joining us. tyou say in your letter you have concerns about allegations that hacking extended to u.s. citizens. >> we do know there are concerns about the possibility that voicemails from 9/11 victims were obtained. there is a chance u.s. citizens may have had their emails accessed by newscorp. because of the alarm about this issue, i joined peter king and louise slaughter, from new york with a strong interest in protecting those victims. they are makin gsurg sure there is no violation of u.s. law, to provide the oversight the constitution requires. >> there was a possibility of victims of this. >> this is not a fishing expedition. the chair of the homeland security committee. th
wish to pay tribute to scott mcclairen for the royal regiment of scotland. this week i witnessed at first hand the sacrifice of our soldiers. i pay tribute to the bravy of this brave soldier. our thoughts will be with his family and friends but we pay tribute and all like him who serve our country so magnificently in afghanistan and elsewhere. >> here, here. >> i had meetings with ministerial members. >> can i agree with what the prime minister said and i have a son in afghanistan. it's a dreaded thing thinking you get that knock on the door that he's lost in action. and our sympathies go with scott's father and mother and that particular team. here, here. >> mr. speaker, that yesterday we give 10 billion pounds to the bailout to banks in greece. we give 7 billion pounds to the bailout in ireland. we give 100 billion, this is the british taxpayer, 100 million a year for their -- the quality of the banks in this country for insurance purposes and other purposes, why does the prime minister does not get on his back and go down to the friends of the city? instead -- >> we got the gi
scotland yard hired a former "news of the world" editor as a media consultant in 2009. the same year investigators decided not to further pursue the phone-hacking case. the former editor, neil wallace, was arrested last week in connection with the scandal. >> i have heard suggestions we must have suspected the alleged involvement of mr. wallace in phone hacking. let me say unequivocally that i did not and had no reason to do so. >> reporter: even with the head of police preparing to step down, scotland yard continues to make arrests. rebekah brooks, former head of rupert murdoch's newspaper arm here in the uk who resigned herself on friday. it was just a week ago that murdoch flew to london and stood by her side, all smiles. brooks had a immediate otheric rise at the condition, becoming editor of "news of the world" when she was only 32. neil sean worked for another murdoch newspaper, "the sun". >> she rose to the top through sheer ambition, networking and an ability to do the job. >> reporter: in 2002 with brooks at the paper's helm that "news of the world" reporters allegedly hacke
, a small number of families have been told by scotland yard that there details were discovered as part of the latest investigation into hacking. this family lost their son in the bombing. the address and phone numbers were in a file. >> we receive personal phone calls from friends and family. to think that when you are at the lowest time of your life, someone for the sake of a story might be listening to you, it is horrendous. >> there has been a separate development related to the former news of the world director. e-mails were run cover that showed that he derived payments from police officers. a subject that both he and his boss for a fact about that a poll -- parliamentary committee. >> will you do it in the future? there is a clear public interest. what ever you want to talk about. >> of course he went on to become the director of communications for a time. the emergency debate on hacking will bring renewed questions on the prime ministers and judgment in hiring him. some believe that a public inquiry is the only way to make sure that it never happens again. >> we have an over-fam
a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> for more on this uproar and the culture which surrounds the british tabloids, i spoke with a reporter from one the best of this as a result of a unique issue with british tabloid journalism. >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you are going to get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best selling newspapers. i suppose if you imagine the national enquirer was the best- selling newspaper in america, he would have the understanding of the state of journalism here. >> what are the pressures on reporters and editors to come up with stories like this and sail close to the legal wednesday to separate >> immense. -- close to the legal winds to do this. >> demands. we are in a situation or circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers. that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line and ethical line of journalism. as we have seen with these latest revelations, hacking into the phones of murder victims, a child murder victims, it's terrible
of highlander battalion in scotland. he served our country and died in the most horrific circumstances and i'm sure the thoughts of the whole house are with his family and friends. >> here, here. >> mr. speaker, the whole country has been appalled by the disclosures, the 7 victims the parents of holly wells and jessica chapman and, of course, it does not involve police officers who were involved in the original investigation. that clearly did not get to the truth. but i do think that we have inquiries that are public and independent and have public confidence. there are two vital issues that we need to look into. the first is the original police inquiry and why that did not get to the bottom, and the second is about the behavior of individual people and individual media organizations, and has the right hon. john allman says, a book into this country. it may be possible to start some of the work earlier. i'm willing to work to make sure we get this right. >> let me thank the prime minister that i am encouraged that the prime minister does not recognize that we need a full inquiry into what ha
scandal this morning. the head of scotland yard steps down and rupertmurdoch executive is arrested as murdoch himself apologizes. >>> 17 states face heat warnings and advisories. now it's headed east as millions of americans prepare for the summer scorcher expected to last for the next few days. >>> casey anthony may be out of jail but perhaps not out of trouble. we'll talk to one of her attorneys about what's next for the troubled accused killer and when she may resurface publicly early this monday morning, july when she may resurface publicly early this monday morning, july 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on monday morning, july 18th. i'm chris wragge. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. erica hill is off this morning. big bumer for the u.s. women's team. they were expected to win the world cup on sunday. a nail biter right to the end. it touched off huge celebrations in japan, where they're still recovering from the disasters, the earthquake, tsunami from early this spring. we'll have more on the tough loss for the u.s. women and wh
. rebekah brooks was released from custody after hours of questioning. >> the head of scotland yard has stepped down even though this top cop insists he did nothing wrong. >> reporter: rebekah brooks was rupert murdock's protege and it's said he considered her his other daughter. sunday she went to scotland yard to answer questions about the cell phone hacking scandal that occurred when she was editor of the tabloid newspaper "news of the world." that they hacked the cell phones of 4,000 people in search of scoops. >> there's no way that a reporter can come in with the kind of salacious, page one stories that "the news of the world" was running without an editor saying, how'd you get that story? who was your source? >> reporter: later in the day, another bombshell. the head of scotland yard resigning. surpail stevenson said he had no involvement in his force's failure to investigate alleged criminal acts by murdock's journalists, nor of the alleged bribery of police officers by "news of the world" reporters. >> i had no knowledge of the extent of this disgraceful practice. >> reporter:
this morning.head of scotland yard steps down. and rupert murdock's top british newspaper boss is arrested as murdock himself apologizeses for the scandal that continues to spread. we'll go live to london. >>> it's summer, but this is ridiculous. a brutal heat wave grips the midwest as 17 states face heat warnings and advisories now it's heading east as millions prepare for the summer scorcher to last for the next few days. >>> and casey anthony may be out of jail, but perhaps not out of trouble. we'll talk to one her attorneys this morning about what's next for the troubled accused killer and when she may resurface publicly early this monday and when she may resurface publicly early this monday morning, july 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "the early show" here on a monday morning. i'm chris wragge. erica hill is off. and did you watch the game yesterday? wow. a big bummer for u.s. somer fans. the u.s. women's team was expected to win the world cup on sunday, had a lot of chances. but lost to japan on penalty kicks. it was a nail biter right to the end. it touched off
editor of the "news of the world" neil wallace. scotland yard admitted two years ago they had hired him to help them improve their public relations. it has emerged that his daughter worked for the metropolitan police and john yates is alleged to help her get the job. when he went to downing street to learn how to restore the image, he made no mention of the relationship with neil waltz. it was that failure to be open that cost him and john yates they're careers. what divides the prime minister and the men from the met is oddly what also connects them. both hired former "news of the world" men to improve their image, the former editor, his deputy neil wallace was hired by yates and stevenson. all insist that they knew nothing about hacking. >> welcome, >> thank you very much. >> the prime minister is on an awkwardly timed trip to south africa. he will return home to make another statement on hacking disputing the holiday by a day. the labor leader says he is incapeable to give the leadership that is required. >> the country needs strong and responsive leadership to restore trust. the pri
investigation. >> and it seems like this would present other problems because scotland yard questioning her, arresting rebekah brooks and yet scotland yards is being investigated because of their inappropriate relations with this media empire. >> well, that's just it. a lot of people are asking just how close were reporters at "news of the world" with police because of new revelations that a former "news of the world" deputy editor was a communication consultant for the police at the same time that he seemed to be reporting back to news international. so there is a lot -- it's a big tangled web here of police contacts, reporters at "news of the world," not to mention high-level politics. remember rebekah brooks was the same person that wine and dined political figures for the murdoch family. that's what makes this arrest so fascinating. she's the highest profile arrest so far. every arrest it seems to have gotten closer and closer to the murdoch family. this is the closest arrest yet. >> okay. thanks so much from london. >>> back to that investigation after an assassination taking place in
is scotland yards code name for its investigation into phone hacking by british tabloids? is it, a, operation weeting, b, operation tweeting, c, operation zoomania, d, operation pocklington. stay tuned. we'll tell you the answer. check out our website. you'll find smart interviews, takes from our favorite experts, including myself. and don't forget, you can follow us on twitter and facebook. this week's book is a terrific week. frederick berlin 1961. it reminds us of a time much scarier than the president when geopolitical tensions were sky high and people feared a nuclear war. the epicenter was berlin. it was the dangerous place on earth. it was a fascinating history of a now forgotten time and place that was a turning point in the cold war. and now for the last look. if all of the in-fighting in washington is getting to you and you're thinking of decamping for more classic shores, we found a surprising study this week that might help you decide where to go and when not to go. the cost of living survey says that the most expensive place for the states is not london, zurich, tokyo, or moscow,
foreign officials, that being detectives at scotland yard, it's a violation of that act. we most frequently see that act being prosecuted with companies opening up plants or supply lines in third world countries and the brother of a prince or son-in-law of a queen gets a contract, basically a bribe, something that's prosecuted here mostly with large corporations doing things like that, but the facts do fit for news corp., if they bribed people at scotland yard to prosecute them in the u.s. >> how serious is the violation of a foreign practices act, something the sort of thing that could have more problems for a company? >> could have more problems, people could go to jail depending on how high you can show there was authorization to violate the act, but the corporation could be put into a monitorship for a period of time as we've seen with wall street companies over the years. they could actually make the company -- have the company lose its charter if they wanted to, but i'd like to move away from the criminal for a second, our federal communications, our fcc has also incredible
with members of parliament questioning members of scotland yard. but why would they at the end? because murdoch has a business deal pending that is worth billions of dollars and eventually he wants the parliament's cooperation to buy bskyb. so it would jeopardize possibly his buying of that corporation. >> yes, indeed. and it seems that senior police officers wither in the pay of rupert murdoch, so it is possible that rupert murdoch not only seduced the politicians, but also the police? >> well, they were accuse of that today, and senior investigator tos at scotland yard, and they vigorously denied those charge, but they did open up the door on the possibility that police officers at a lower level were paid for news tips, and it does seem as if there is evidence out there that that was a common practice at least that is what is being alleged right now, it was a common practice of "news of the world" and perhaps other publications belonging to rupert murdoch, but investigators today vehemently denying that there was a conspiracy behind their investigation or the fact that their investigation did
's office. >> we are also get, reports scotland yard is beefing up its team of investigators working the case as well. >> reporter: we have always known there is the possibility this investigation could go further. we have now been able to confirm that. the information commission says that they handed over details to the police of another private investigator that was illegally harvesting information and then selling it on to newspapers. newspapers that are not news international newspapers. among the top newspapers, according to the information commission, "the daily mail," "the daily mirror," those are not news international papers and it does seem now that they, too, may be included as part of the ongoing police investigation. one of the inning things is this is not necessarily phone hacking. this could be something called blagging which is impersonating somebody to try to get personal information about them. that is illegal here and also according to the information commission, corruption. this would be mean payouts basically to get that sort of information illegally. the details
resign from scotland yard and david cameron cuts short a foreign trip as calls for his resignation appear in the british press. now, most disturbingly, sean hoare, one two of the whistle-blowing journalists that brought it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. i
families were victimized, too. scotland yard now says up to 4,000 people may have been targeted, in all. investigators are also looking into allegations that "news of the world" paid members of london's metropolitan police for information. the scandal prompted ford motor and a host of other companies to pull their ads from "news of the world." there are political implications too. in an emergency debate yesterday, members of parliament of both parties excoriated murdoch and his newspaper. but prime minister david cameron stopped short of calling for a separate official inquiry. >> what this government is doing is making sure that the fact the public and i feel so appalled about what has happened. murder victims, terrorist victims who have had their phones hacked is quite disgraceful and that is why it is important that there is a full police investigation with all the powers that they need. >> warner: labor leader ed miliband pointedly noted that a former "news of the world" editor had been part of cameron's inner circle. andy coulson was forced to resign as downing street communication
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 144 (some duplicates have been removed)